Oundle Cinema Docs - 2013

Set on the border between Gaza and Israel and looking at the nature of their conflict through the eyes of a Gazan peasant, Emad. He buys a video camera when his fourth son is born in order to record their family celebrations. But the camera and the camerman become obsessed with recording the nature of life in this zone of occupation and the increasing politicisation of his friends. As the conflict increases, protests  develope,  arrests increase  and the intimidation begins to become life-threatening. The cameras, as well as people,  fall victim to destruction. The Wall and the lives of Palestinians become intertwined. Conflicts over land rights and settlements, a case of raw injustice, is vividly documented, yet it is not vindictive, which just increases the power of the portrayal this conflict.

 

Wednesday 20th March, 7.45pm

Chasing Ice (2012) - Jeff Orlowski

Starting out as a climate change sceptic, James Balog, turns into one of the most compelling and visceral film-makers on climate change. Part story of the what it takes to provide  great time-lapse photography the film turns into documenting the  collapse of  huge sections of the arctic ice mass. He captures the most stunning of images: turquoise rivers of ice melt, a field of sea ice arching in strange and elegant shapes, night-time shots of ice boulders shining against a popped starscape, but most impressive and frightening is the ‘calving’ of the Arctic shelf, which is described as the equivalent of “Manhattan falling into the sea”. Though it lacks coherent scientific explanation, that in itself becomes a positive  asset, as it doesn’t argue a case it simply compels you to see that we live in times of great change. It should not leave you indifferent.

 

Wednesday 17th April, 7.45pm

Patience after Sebald (2012) - In the footsteps of the acclaimed writer Sebald in East Anglia

Chasing Ice - film of the impact of the collapse of the Arctic glaciers.

 

www.chasingice.com/see-the-film/trailer/

 

Starting out as a climate change sceptic, James Balog, turns into one of the most compelling and visceral film-makers on climate change. Part story of the what it takes to provide  great time-lapse photography the film turns into documenting the  collapse of  huge sections of the arctic ice mass. He captures the most stunning of images: turquoise rivers of ice melt, a field of sea ice arching in strange and elegant shapes, night-time shots of ice boulders shining against a popped starscape, but most impressive and frightening is the ‘calving’ of the Arctic shelf, which is described as the equivalent of “Manhattan falling into the sea”. Though it lacks coherent scientific explanation, that in itself becomes a positive  asset, as it doesn’t argue a case it simply compels you to see that we live in times of great change. It should not leave you indifferent.

 

Wednesday 15th May, 7.45pm

Steam of Life (2010) - dir: Joonas Bergall & Mika Hotakainen

A sauna in a telephone box and Finnish men who talk... in a film where something special has been unearthed. A country with 5 million inhabitants and 2 million saunas and time to find consolation in these steam rooms. This is a wonderful dissection of a national institution. Here, Finns delve into some of their most cherished or repressed memories. Stories of love, death, birth, friendship and punctuated by beautiful shots of the Finnish landscape and a whimsical comedy. There is a complete naturalism to this film where the search for the right way to express emotion becomes a powerful tool within the film. By the end of the film, it is difficult not to feel as though you have been sitting with them in the sauna and participating in the experience  of cleansing  as well as looking deeply into their souls.

 

Wednesday 19th June, 7.45pm

Miner's Hymns (2010) - Bill Morrison

A poetically and politically charged doc about the demise of mining in Britain, but with an innovative musical score.

 

www.vimeo.com/32663255

 

A film that opens with a helicopter journey over the contemporary landscape of the mining areas of northern England. Mines becoming shopping malls and football stadiums. But then it journeys back, with the extremely clever and powerful use of archival material to evoke the mining communities and the life of miners. The film is accompanied by a moving contemporary score, specifically composed by the Icelandic composer, Johann Johannsson.  The film is not a paen to the lost world of the miners, but it charts, firstly,  the harshness and grittiness of their world. Then it pears onto the margins of the mining world: children play on heaps of tailings, man-made structures haunt the skyline. Inexorably the film journeys into the strikes of the 1980’s dominated by the conflict between the wheels of a government apparatus and the miners determination. The film ends with the traditional parade of the miners unions joining in a service in Durham cathedral. The film is both an elegy and a dissection of a society that has disappeared, one that had many strengths and many weaknesses, one that Morrisson is not arguing that should return, but that its values be remembered.

 

£25 per subscriber (£5/film x 5films) or

£8 per film on the door on the night

Advert for first film of the season of Oundle Cinema Docs

Advert for the first unofficial film of the season (above)

A short clip of the first showing (below) from Latvian TV

Here at the Water Tower in Brigstock we are showing a new program of films for 2013's Oundle Cinema Docs.

 

We have five films on our program from international film makers taking on a range of diverse subjects. Presented in a welcoming and friendly setting.

 

For booking and more information please do get in touch. My contact details can be found here.

 

Pricing:

£25 per subscriber (£5/film x 5films) or

£8 per film on the door on the night.

Filmography : Docs 2013

Wednesday 20th February, 7.45pm

Five Broken Cameras (2011) -

Emad Burnat, Guy Davidi.

A very poignant film about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, filmed from the perspective of Gaza.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_93nOqwmhU